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with countries around the world in deeper trade, investment in science and technology, development, all efforts that can spark economic growth for all of our people. such efforts depend on a spirit of mutual interest and mutual respect. no government or company, no school will be confident working in a country where its people are endangered. four partnerships to be affective, our citizens must be secured and our efforts must be welcomed. a politics based only on anger, one based on dividing the world between us and them, if it ultimately undermines those who tolerate it. all of us have an interest in standing up to those forces. let us remember that muslims have suffered the most at the hands of extremism. on the same day our civilians were killed and in benghazi a turkish police officer was killed days before his wedding. several afghan children were more by their parents just days after they were killed by a suicide bomber in kabul. it may initially be focused on the west, but over time it cannot be contained. the same impulses of extremism is used to justify war between tribes and clans. it
scouting out locations or a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." this is about 30 minutes. >> if we could have everybody in the back come on up that's going to join us. thank you so much for your patience. the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block was around as. apparently -- thank you. people are nodding, so that's good. thank you very much. there may be some people still held up and we will welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter earnest, executive director and i'll ask you as a courtesy, to those for recording the program and to the speakers, the kind enough to turn off your cell phones, pdas and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. well, it's wonderful to see all of you here for the signing, and as we kick off the signing, i will show you a clip of the film based on the book for which you came to attempt the signing. so with that said we will go right ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. >> [inaudible] >> has shocked the civilized world. more than 60 american citizens continue to be held as hostages. >> six
a history degree over a computer science degree. there has to be more rewards for the need in america or the jobs are going to start going abroad faster and faster, high paying jobs. there's no specific plan to get that done. >> all right. that's got to be the last word. all right. did you catch who these guys are talking about? >> that man is working hard for you. >> a true hero. >> you're lucky to have a guy so bright and so capable and committed. my friend, and a true patriot. >> well, obviously, they're referring to none other than our neil cavuto covering the debates like no one else starting this wednesday live from denver, kicking off on fox news at 4 p.m. eastern and neil gets the biggest and brightest players, so, watch it and profit. before the first presidential debate. neil talks to the republican vice-presidential nominee. >> you mentioned bowles simpson, sir, and you voted against that, so, your critics say-- >> i like that part of bowls simpson. the critics say you talk a good game and you don't deliver the goods. what do you say? >> will paul ryan's answer be to fix it
of marine science released a report tuesday saying a number of reeves has gone from 100 to 47 since 1985. experts blame the rapid increase in crown of thornz star fish which eat the coral. they found that ocean warming is a major cause of coral bleaching and prevents the coral from recovering from cyclone damage and they worry that it could halve againy the next decade if current trends continue. >> we believe if we can take action, the crown of thorn star fish, it may leave the reef in a position that can better withstand the climactic impact. >> the great barrier reef extends more than 2,000 kilometers off the coast of northeastern australia and is a world heritage site. >>> a gallery of japanese art has opened at an art museum in melbourne, australia. a ceremony was held on tuesday for the opening of the paulen gander gallery of japanese art named after gandel who donated her collection of japanese art. they performed a japanese ritual to celebrate the opening and the exhibits include a buddhist statue from the 8th to 12th century and a hanging scroll by an 18th century artist. it has
of marine science says the number of reefs has dropped from 100 to 47. since 1985. the scientists identified two main causes of coral decline. the crown of thorn star fish is growing rapidly in number. the fish feed on the coral. and ocean warming is bleaching the coral. the scientists say this prevents the reef from recovering after cyclone damage. they worn coral cover could halve again by the end of the next decade if current trends continue. >> we believe that if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorn starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of these climatic impacts. >> the reef extends more than 2,000 kilometers off the coast of northeastern australia. >>> officials and locals in india pulled together to pull one endangered species from the mud. they spent ten hours digging an indian rhinoceros from a swamp in the northeastern state. about 2,300 rhinos live in the national park, two-thirds of the world's population of the endangered animal. one of the rhinos strayed from the park after it was hit by fl
science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations he has for himself. but look, i think part of that was because as i said earlier, we met a new mitt romney, we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan, which was his tax cut. i don't have a tax plan that is 4.8 trillion, i am not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a voucher plan, i love teachers, i think we need more of them. don't believe me, speaker gingrich was eloquent in the primaries, saying that mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> the president had 90 minutes, now, if he had done his homework and prepared, if he had actually studied romney, why didn't he say it? virtually every analyst has said, and even your deputy campaign manager has said the charges -- was made wrong. forgetting that for a second, the job of the president is supposed to be able to be competent and to stand up for what he believes in and articulate what is wrong. mitt romney walked over him. >> and alex, you mentioned the president is air born to the golden s
. an innovative, inventive economy driven by advances in science and research. and yes, a clean, green economy too, powered by the new low- carbon technologies. britain leading the world. [applause] but i have to tell you, we will not succeed in this last task unless we can see off that most short-sighted of arguments, that we have to choose between going green and going for growth. decarbonising our economy isn't just the right thing to do, it's a fantastic economic opportunity. the green economy in britain is growing strongly right now, bringing in billions of pounds and creating thousands of jobs -- in wind, solar and tidal energy, the technologies that will power our economy in the decades to come. going green means going for growth. but more than that, it means going for more energy that we produce ourselves and which never runs out, it means going for clear air and clean water and a planet we can proudly hand over to our children. going green means going forward. so let the conservatives be in no doubt. we will hold them to their promises on the environment. [applause] of course, there was a
their heads thinking there is no way this could possibly work. the practices have no basis in science or medicine and they will now be relegated to the dust bin of quackery, your governor, david, is calling what you do quackery. can you just react to that and tell me how this new law will affect what you do? >> yes. let me tell you what kind of governor we have now. so, for instance, if a child is -- let me tell you first, any good competent therapist knows that homosexual feelings can result when one -- i'm talking about boys now, when one is raped or sexually molested. later in life, those feelings come up. what our governor decided now he knows best that the kind of profound affective therapy is quackery, that handles this kind of situation. >> david, how about the american psychiatric -- forgive me, i'll add on to the governor, the american psychiatric association says the potential risk of reparative therapy is great including depression, anxiety, self-destructive behavior, reparative therapy, this is the truth wins out, reparative therapy is junk science winning out by religious
with the right skills here at home. nevada, i wanted, recruit thousands of new math and science teachers, improve early education, create 2 million more slots in community colleges so that workers can get trained for the new jobs out there now. help us work with colleges and universities to keep tuition down. that is a goal we can meet together. you cannot choose that future for america -- can choose that future for america, but what we need to do? >> vote. >> i have already worked with republicans and democrats to cut spending by $1 trillion. i'm willing to do a little bit more. i want to reform our tax code so that idea is simple and fair. but i also want to ask the wealthiest households in america to pay slightly higher taxes. that is the same rate we had when bill clinton was president and we created 23 million new jobs, the biggest surplus in history, and a whole lot of millionaires to boot. [applause] so that is my plan. in fairness, my opponent has got a plan, too. there's only one problem. some of you heard bill clinton say that there is no or arithmetic in it. [laughter] they think that
-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. he is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of the new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard" which he founded in 1995. prior to that, he led the publican -- republican feature. he also has served as foreign policy adviser to senator john mccain. all of you see him regularly on fox news sunday and the fox news channel. i met him in 1981 when he was a very young assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. the question that i would like to pose for each of you, and i will start with governor what does this through feel about the leadership styles of mitt romney and president obama? >> probably not much. >> ok, will this panel is over. [laughter] >> you could extrapolate a few things from president obama's first term that may be instructive. he is not the manager. he does out of a history of managing things. you bring in a lot of good, well trained people and give them tasks and try
-span, there would be blood in the streets. >> we're going to talk about neuro science >> reporter: in the end e-health's lobbying was successful in changing the rules. low-income americans will be allowed to use their subsidies to buy insurance on e-health. did you have to write a proposed regulation to hand them? >> we've written a lot. at the end of the day the regulation didn't use all of our language. that was fine. but it caught the essence of this. and it included some things that these people in health and human services thought were important which we agreed with. >> that was a good meeting i would say that the process here is far from elegant. the process here involves influence >> you guys still do a lot of military? >> democracy is a messy way of governing yourself. and there are imperfections that people vote for bills that they don't read. they vote for words that lobby i haves have written. but it is the system that's better than any other system. we just have to make it better in my view by having more transparency. ♪ >> osgood: coming up, the cold facts. ♪ into a scooter tha
are failing us. a bill to expand the green cards allotted to foreign students in stem field, science, technology, engineering, mathematics, was voted down in congress. on a recent prime time special on cnn, "fixing immigration," i pointed out that canada and australia now have larger foreign-born populations than the united states. both of those countries revamped their immigration systems to attract and keep the best and brightest foreigners, but we're closing the door to many of the smartest potential entrepreneurs in the world. if we want job creators, let's stop kicking them out of the country. >>> when we come back, mahmoud ahmadinejad apologizes to new yorkers. more of my interview with the president of iran. ♪ so, i'm working on a cistern intake valve, and the guy hands me a locknut wrench. no way! i'm like, what is this, a drainpipe slipknot? wherever your business takes you, nobody keeps you on the road like progressive commercial auto. [ flo speaking japanese ] [ shouting in japanese ] we work wherever you work. now, that's progressive. call or click today. >>> president
on the global list of whether it's science or engineering or technology or whatever it may be. what has happened to the american dream that has allowed things to get so low in so many key areas. why is the rest of the world overtaking and what should be done about it? >> i think it's priorities and values and greed, really, and at the end of the day, it's greed and lack of leadership to the point why i don't see how it makes so much sense how we spend so much money on prisons versus education, and that doesn't make any sense to me at all. i don't see why we can't manufacture things in america. i don't -- i don't get it. >> i want to pitch in on manufacturing for just a second. one of the problems that we have with american manufacturing is we're an older manufacturing economy, and we areused to paper orders and contract processes and other things. if you go to china and have a network like ollie bubba. we know that we can move more into the internet age with our manufacturing in our bidding and ordering process. >> is china the enemy that many americans see it as or should it be a global trading
's science or engineers or whatever it may be. what has happened to the american dream that's allowed things to get so low. why is the rest of the world overtaking and what should be done about it? >> i think it's priorities and values and greed at the end of the day it's greed and lack of leadership tot point where i don't see why it makes sense that we spend so much money or prisons versus education. that doesn't make any sense to me at all. i don't see why we can't manufacture things in america. i don't get it. >> i want to pitch in on manufacturing for a second. >> one of the problems we have with american manufacture manuf we're older. we are used to paper and those types of things. china has natural sources electronically. we know one of the things we can do in america is move more in the internet age in our manufacturing and bidding and ordering process. >> is china the enemy as many people see it as or should it be a global trading partner. >> i think we live in a very diverse world and we need to embrace that. if china is excelling in something, that's great but guess what, america
there in the future. science, technology, and space offering technology to everybody, all the you -- all of the young ones coming up. ronald reagan is clearly the strongest leader of the free world. i will be honest with you. it is a joy to serve with a president who does not apologize for the united states of america. mr. mondale on the other hand has one idea. go out and tax the american people. he wants to wipe out the one protection that those of the lowest end of the economic scale have protecting them against being rammed into higher and higher tax brackets. we owe our country too much to go back to that kind of an approach. i would like to say something to the young people. i know what it is to have a dream and to have a job and to work hard to really participate and to the american dream. some of your finishing high school and college, some of your starting off in the workplace. we want america oppose the greatest grift -- america's greatest griffeift. it is absolutely essential that we guarantee the young people that the they will not know the agony of war. gift, opportunity and peace. we mu
they need, they resort to things like self medicating. the science has proven, research has proven this is a fact. our all of these or substance abuse, depression, those are the most common diagnoses in ptsd. what we're faced with is an archaic military justice system that has not adapted, even though their own their own military law reviews show ptsd and substance abuse-related misconduct are close the related, that there is a nexus that one comes from the other. what we are addressing -- we're not asking the military to not have people held accountable for misconduct. if you need to punish someone because they illegally or in violation of regulation of used the illegal substances, go ahead and punish them within the system, but that does not mean you up to go to the extent of imposing administrative sanctions that have an impact on the rest of their life such as taking away all their benefits and then putting a person without a safety net out into the community where they then become a problem in my community. and all they do is end of draining the resources of my community. and
that the president's agenda of investment in education, more math and science teachers, help for manufacturing in the u.s., reducing oil dependency and balance much trade deficit. melissa: all you've done is talking points. you haven't answer ad single question. we're out of time. could you anticipates one of the questions. >> melissa, here is the facts. the facts are, more people are going back to work. the unemployment rate is 7.8%. this is looking very much like 1984 and ronald reagan. unemployment down, people back to work. melissa: thanks for coming on the show. we appreciate your time. >> my pleasure. melissa: so there is big divide in the jobs data today, as we're discussing household survey shows total employment surged 873,000, but payroll says only 114,000 people went back to work. even jack welch said it, hard to reconcile these numbers. he tweeted, unbelievable jobs numbers. these chicago guys will do anything. can't debate so they change the numbers. that is harsh criticism. here with me is economist peter morici. which also have gary burtless, senior fellow? [no audio. what do yo
. pretty simple. it's not rocket science. >> we'll be watching wednesday night. thank you for a terrific roundtables. for those at home, governor barbour and dean will answer your questions on twitter. >>> and now -- three moments from this week in history. what year was it? >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> a new swing vote on the supreme court. >> judge and now justice kennedy. sounds good, doesn't it? >>> it appears that pan-american flight 103 was bombed. terrorism. >> 270 killed over lockerbie, scotland. >>> and -- the opening night for broadway's longest running show. >> it's far more than an old-fashioned broadway musical. it's very thetheoratical. >> was it 1986, 1987 or 1988? we'll be right back with the answer. >>> so what year was it? and every day since, we've worked hard to keep it. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help people and businesses who were affected, and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open for everyone to enjoy -- and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. we've shared what we've learned with go
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ...and we inspected his brakes for free. -free is good. -free is very good. [ male announcer ] now get 50% off brake pads and shoes at meineke. >>> all right. time now for the "ridiculist." tonight, we're adding all the nonbelievers out there. in case you don't know any 12-year-old girls a believer is what the kids called the super fans of pop star justin bieber. you have the non-beliebers on the "ridiculist." even if you're not familiar with his music, you think music should be in quotation marks when it refers to what he does, you got to admit that young man has one heck of a work ethic. so much so, in fact, that even if he barfs onstage in the middle of a concert, he just keeps on going. >> yeah. he just leaned right over and hurled onstage right in the middle of a song but do you think a little bit of vomit can stop the tiny juggernaut that is justin bieber? no. he just kept on going. later that night, he tweeted this. quote, great show, getting
results in just two days. the research was published in the journal, "science translational medicine." the paper reported the tests of just six newborns in neonatal units, but the implications could be widespread. roughly 20% of infant deaths in the u.s. are caused by inherited genetic conditions, according to the study. doctor stephen kingsmore led the research team at children's mercy hospitals in kansas city. he's the director for the center for pediatric genomic medicine there. dr. kingsmore, welcome, and thank you for being with us. first of all,-- >> thank you very much. >> warner: how big a breakthrough is this? >> this is a big breakthrough. we've been working toward this goal for a coup of years now. there has been a big gap between the knowledge that we have of genetic diseases, about 35% of them, and the ability for doctors to identify which of these was a problem in any given child with an illness. >> warner: and up until now, how much have you been able to diagnose the d.n.a. abnormalities? how quickly? i mean, i said it can take weeks and weeks, but what's the process t
, rational thought. the current party has waged a war in science. climate denial is horrifying. it's war on reason. you cited former vice president dick cheney that deficits do not matter. karl rove said it that we create our own realities. you live in it. a romney pollsters said we will not be restricted by fact checkers. i refer to a post-truth world. the problem is the policy oriented. the party has been captured by people like grover norquist who is a ferocious anti-tax ideologue who has forced many members of the house and senate to abide by his pledge of no tax increases. where do you get the revenue to help build the country? when people talk about the deficit -- it is not the deficit or debt but joblessness which is the great crisis of our times. the deficit and debt did not arrive from some inaccurate conception. -- immaculate conception. two unfunded wars, medicare part d. let them speak to that. mitt romney has it fantastical approach to arithmetic. at the bottom of it, there is a commitment and an ideology to insuring that the top 1% make out real well. those most vulnerable
have the most government-funded research. we push the balance on science and technology, so our best innovators are here. in education, we now, well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to ld the world in college graduates. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers, we are now $2 trillion in deficits in terms of infrastructure. a great education, and get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on each one of these issues that are so vital to our greatest strength. i don't think we can remedy this . and on budget-funded research, it looks wike an e.k.g. heading for a heart attack. in terms of the things that have historically made us great on each one of those indices, i see us not going in the direction we should be going. for me that's the alarm bell and the wake-up call. >> are we as strong as we have ever been or are there ways you see measurable? >> it is on obvious we are not as strong as we have ever been. but also because the world was changed around us. we spent an awful lot of time, eff
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. monarch of marketing analysis. with the ability to improve roi through seo all by cob. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. i'm going b-i-g. [ male announcer ] good choice business pro. good choice. go national. go like a pro. [ male announcer ] the exceedingly nimble, ridiculously agile, tight turning, fun to drive 2013 smart. ♪ >>> beer's going to have the fed minutes right at the top of the hour. then we're going to look at how big ben, the puppet master, pulls the strings behind the scenes of the central bank to get what he wants. >>> we're also going to take a look at the real jobs killers in america. we debate whether safety nets are really anchors on our economy. >>> what our kids should really be taught for all that money. lots of things coming up on street signs. back to "power lunch." >>> jamie dimon was one of wall street's heroes during the economic meltdown but his
the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers we are now $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration we have a policy to get a great education and then get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h-1b issues that are so vital for our future strength. fourth, the rules for incentivizing risk-taking and preventing recklessness. i don't think that we have in any way remedied that the way we want and on the government funded research if it looks like an ekg heading for a heart attack. i don't know if they are relative to what. all i know is in the things that have historically made us great, on each one of those i see us not g
finance the transcontinental railroad. let's start the national academy of sciences. let's start the land grant colleges because we want to give the gateway if they are giving opportunity we are all going to be better off. that doesn't restrict people's freedom, that enhances it. so what i have tried to do as president is to apply the same principles. >> that's president obama from the debate this week on the role of government. now let's listen to his challenger, mitt romney, with his answer to that question. >> first, life and liberty. we have a responsibility to protect the life and liberty of our people and that means military second to none. i do not believe in cutting the military. i believe in maintaining the strength of america's military. second, in the line that says we are in doubt by our creator with rights i believe we must maintain our commitment to religious tolerance and freedom in this country. that statement also says that we are endowed by our creator with a right to pursue happiness as we choose. i interpret that as one, making sure those are less fortunate and can't c
. there is some corals that live for many thousands of yeernz we found through some of the science we do we can drill holes down to the center of the corals and look at annual growth rings and we can look at when, in fact, when the first agriculture in australia happened, we saw a change in the type of chemistry that the annual growth rings and coral were depositing. so we have seen a chronology of increased siltation, of increased fertilization, of
always console himself with the political science which shows that presidential debates rarely affect the outcome of an election. even if you think your guy won, is it going to help? >> sure. the fact that, i heard there was 50 million people watching last night. i would estimate that 20 million of them had never seen anything but an obama mitt romney. never had seen the governor before. they got a chance to see who the real governor is. that he has dealt with these kinds of issues as governor. that he has created bipartisan legislation out of policies and that he understands what is causing the shortage of jobs in america. i go back to what i said. the president demonstrated his incompetent sense and it is amazing to me, now the rehabilitation of the president's mess last night is beginning to start and you see the left-wing press now starting to make up excuses and say, well he just had a bad night. he didn't have a bad night. the obama you saw last night is the obama that has been in the white house for four years. that's why we have a problem. jon: you don't think there will be a
moderator. jenna: like him on that. gregg: let's recruit him. sounds like something out of science fiction but scientists say they developed medical devices that dissolve safely inside the body. we'll have that story coming up or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. jenna: some very interesting medical news for you. scientists say they have developed medical devices that do the work they're designed for on side your body and then, just dissolve. what happens to them? that is the question we have for dr. ernest patty, senior attending physician at st. barna bass hospital in the bronx. doctor, what are we talking about here? medical devices that dissolve, come on. >> small electronic devices. call them transient electronics made out of silicon and magnesium. they're covered in a silk cocoon. they use the silk because the silk is absorbed by the body as well as silicon and magnesium. jenna: what is scenario where someone may have a medical device you're describing? >> th
the most government funded research fop push out the boundary of science and technology our best innovators and entrepreneurs can pluck them and start the new company. it you think about that as the formula for success an education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high schools drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming to high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to american society of civil engineers we're $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration, we have a policy now that basically says here come here get a great education and get the hell of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h1b issues that are vital phenomena the future strength. fourth the rules for incentive risk taking and recklessness. i don't think we have em i didded to the degree we want. on government funded research if you see in the gap it looks like ekg heading for heart attack. i don't know relative to what all i know in terms of the things that historically made us great, on each one of those, i see us not going in the direction we shou
nomg or science that we stable an h1b visa to them so they can stay in this country and help grow jobs here. he has always made keeping families together part of his comprehensive immigration reform. >> but he has never said that he would let these visas stand that the president just granted. >> no, no, no. what you just said to me was he said he was going to have it taken care of. meaning that he has said that among his top priorities would be working with congress, enacting a comprehensive immigration reform. of which keeping families together would be part ofhat program. so i think it's totally consistent with what he said, because it's a top priority of his to get done. and unlike this president, he would get it done in the first two years of his administration. >> it may be consistent but you do agree what he told the denver post last night is new. it is new news as we say in the news business. he's never said that before. >> well, you may be saying he never used those same words in the same sentence before. but if you go ahead and look at mitt romney dotcom where he laid out his
and every like to possessors of political science speculating in the abstract about the nature of international politics. you may wonder why it was because of fact the only thing worth talking about was at that point whether we could establish enough confidence between the two of us to risky adventure that opening to china representative for both sides shown that point of view, from a domestic, political point of view. and even though the subject of president nixon to china, was the reason why i came, neither side mentioned it until about 12 hours before. i mention not only to say i believe it should be followed to get your object it straight before you start haggling about details. we had no choice. now every generation and then was a great reform and i cannot think of any other country where you could definitely say that the evolution that we have seen in the last 30 years, depending on the vision of one man, as in the case of no other chinese who had the vision and the courage to move china into the imaginative system and to engage the reform and instituting a market system.
." brigid callahan harrison, professor of political science at state university. herb jackson, washington correspondent for the record hurt and my colligan chief clinical correspondent for njtv. we have questions reported earlier by the news director of wbgo-fm, doug doyle, which is seen throughout the broadcast. here's the rules throughout the debate. each candidate will have 90 seconds for an opening and closing statement in a show of 60 seconds to answer questions from our panel. then move onto the next question. there is a timing light here to keep us on schedule. it is my job to try and force that. the audience has promised once again to make my job a bit easier and show proper respect to the candidates by holding their applause until we have this broadcast. it conducted during the conversation during the broadcast come you can follow us on twitter using the hash tag and jay debate. let's begin. we tossed a coin. senator kyrillos goes first. kyrillos: mike, thank you very much and to njtv and montclair state for this debate. you know, i love this country. i love america. all of us ar
harrison, professor political science at my here at montclair state university. herb jackson, washington correspondent for the record. and my colleague, michael aron for njtv. we have questions reported earlier by the news director of wbgo-fm, doug doyle throughout the court pass. here are the rules. each candidate was 90 seconds for an opening and closing statement and each will have 60 seconds to answer questions for our panel. then we will build onto the next question. there is a title like that keeps us on schedule and it is my job to try to enforce a timing light. the audience has promised once again can make my job a bit easier and show proper respect to candidates by holding a pause until we end this broadcast. if you'd like to join the conversation during the broadcast, follow us on twitter using the hash tag mj debate. we tossed a coin. senator kyrillos goes first. your opening statement. kyrillos: mike, thank you very much. thank you to the record at montclair state and you senator menendez for this debate. you know, i love this country. i love america. all of us are blessed to
100,000 math and science teachers. train two million workers in community college, bring down the cost of college tuition. [cheers and applause] we need to cut our oil imports in half, create thousands more jobs in clean energy. we need to use the savings from end the wars in iraq and afghanistan to help pay down our deficit and put people back to work doing some nation-building right here at home. that's the agenda we need. that is how the you strengthen the middle class. that is how you keep moving forward. that is the choice in this election. and that's why i'm running for a second term. that's why what need. [cheers and applause] now my opponent --. jon: if you would like to watch the rest of president obama's remarks there at george mason university in virginia, we have them streaming live for you right now on foxnews.com. >>> new information now on a deadly outbreak of meningitis that has spread to several states. investigators are now focusing on the safety of the suspected source, custom mix medication. how many drugs are involved here and is anybody overseeing the process? her
and science -- math and reading that, in fact, our minority students, our hispanic and african-american students with disabilitieses are doing better and the gap between them and the majority population is, in fact, closing. so, we are doing exactly the right thing. they're the ones who have been for the patriot act, then against it, for no child left behind, then against it. >> mr. vice president, our final -- i'm sorry. you have 30 seconds, senator edwards. >> yeah. he started. yeah. 30 seconds. yes. we are for accountability. and we are for high standards. john and i voted for no child left behind because we thought the accountability and standards were the right thing to do. did you figure out you were wrong? >> i did. >> in fairness, if you feel you need to go to him -- >> i do. because we're on the final question. i surprise for giving you 15 seconds. whichever one of you is elected in november, you mentioned the three electoral votes in wyoming and how critical they were, but you'll inherit a very deeply divided country economically, politically, you name it. how do you
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